Author Topic: 'Kings Park': Old Mental Asylums Shed Light on Newtown Crisis  (Read 3476 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline skully

  • A bunker
  • Administrator
  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 757
  • InsaneKarma: +11/-1
    • InsaneBunkers
Explore, Archive, Share

Offline CarbonCavi

  • Trusted Member
  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 947
  • InsaneKarma: +18/-11
    • MYSPACE!
Re: 'Kings Park': Old Mental Asylums Shed Light on Newtown Crisis
« Reply #1 on: December 22, 2012, 09:08:09 PM »
Wow. interesting for sure!
Im lethal from a 2nd gear roll.

Offline Kurt

  • PlymouthCountyHospital
  • Trusted Member
  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 522
  • InsaneKarma: +39/-11
  • life is not a waiting room.
Re: 'Kings Park': Old Mental Asylums Shed Light on Newtown Crisis
« Reply #2 on: December 26, 2012, 03:04:46 AM »
Nice read. Been following the movie for the past year, cant wait to actually see it. KPPC  was one of my first explores outside of new england a couple years ago.

Offline Megster

  • Crazy Cat Lady of IB
  • Administrator
  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1059
  • InsaneKarma: +15/-3
Re: 'Kings Park': Old Mental Asylums Shed Light on Newtown Crisis
« Reply #3 on: December 30, 2012, 04:22:27 PM »
I would like to see this movie as well.  We have a severe problem with mental healthcare in this country.

Dumping the mentally ill on the streets of Norwich when NSH closed in 1996 was the worst thing that could have happened to them.  Those who didn't end up in the halfway house across the street from the Wauregan are sleeping in the park near the harbor and under the bridges, and Norwich leaders are wondering why they can't bring downtown Norwich back to life.  Heads up, no one wants to visit downtown Norwich because you get approached and followed by people who are probably harmless but have some serious personal space violation issues and no one wants to deal with them.  Yet when Norwich leaders try to come up with some huge plan to save the city, they completely neglect the issue of the colony of former inpatients living on the streets.  Not to say we should just lock them up in a closet somewhere, but if you compare Norwich to Middletown, where CVH is still in operation with at least two homeless shelters on campus (along with a Dept. of Corrections halfway house), people don't get approached as often and lots of people visit Middletown.  Shop owners want to have a shop on Main St. and their patrons feel safe.  The mentally ill will always be among us and we have to know how to accommodate them in a way that would be most beneficial to them, whether we can cure them, help them, or in the very least keep them safe.  We can't afford to ignore them, but there has to be a better way than what we have now.
I hide in the shadows and babble about old things.  I appear to most new members of IB.  I might beat you with my cane.

http://adventureswithmeg.weebly.com
http://meganmcgory.smugmug.com
http://meganmcgory.com

Offline CarbonCavi

  • Trusted Member
  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 947
  • InsaneKarma: +18/-11
    • MYSPACE!
Re: 'Kings Park': Old Mental Asylums Shed Light on Newtown Crisis
« Reply #4 on: January 02, 2013, 11:43:27 AM »
I would like to see this movie as well.  We have a severe problem with mental healthcare in this country.

Dumping the mentally ill on the streets of Norwich when NSH closed in 1996 was the worst thing that could have happened to them.  Those who didn't end up in the halfway house across the street from the Wauregan are sleeping in the park near the harbor and under the bridges, and Norwich leaders are wondering why they can't bring downtown Norwich back to life.  Heads up, no one wants to visit downtown Norwich because you get approached and followed by people who are probably harmless but have some serious personal space violation issues and no one wants to deal with them.  Yet when Norwich leaders try to come up with some huge plan to save the city, they completely neglect the issue of the colony of former inpatients living on the streets.  Not to say we should just lock them up in a closet somewhere, but if you compare Norwich to Middletown, where CVH is still in operation with at least two homeless shelters on campus (along with a Dept. of Corrections halfway house), people don't get approached as often and lots of people visit Middletown.  Shop owners want to have a shop on Main St. and their patrons feel safe.  The mentally ill will always be among us and we have to know how to accommodate them in a way that would be most beneficial to them, whether we can cure them, help them, or in the very least keep them safe.  We can't afford to ignore them, but there has to be a better way than what we have now.

Couldnt have said this better myself.
Im lethal from a 2nd gear roll.